Reducing Downtime Due to System Maintenance and Upgrades

Shaya Potter, Jason Nieh

Proceedings of the 19th Large Installation System Administration Conference (LISA 2005), San Diego, CA, December 4-9, 2005, pp. 47-62. (Best Student Paper Award)

Abstract

Patching, upgrading, and maintaining operating system software is a growing management complexity problem that can result in unacceptable system downtime. We introduce AutoPod, a system that enables unscheduled operating system updates while preserving application service availability. AutoPod provides a group of processes and associated users with an isolated machine- independent virtualized environment that is decoupled from the underlying operating system instance. This virtualized environment is integrated with a novel checkpoint-restart mechanism which allows processes to be suspended, resumed, and migrated across operating system kernel versions with different security and maintenance patches. AutoPod incorporates a system status service to determine when operating system patches need to be applied to the current host, then automatically migrates application services to another host to preserve their availability while the current host is updated and rebooted. We have implemented AutoPod on Linux without requiring any application or operating system kernel changes. Our measurements on real world desktop and server applications demonstrate that AutoPod imposes little overhead and provides sub-second suspend and resume times that can be an order of magnitude faster than starting applications after a system reboot. AutoPod enables systems to autonomically stay updated with relevant maintenance and security patches, while ensuring no loss of data and minimizing service disruption.

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lisa2005:fordist

Columbia University Department of Computer Science